modern fantasy artists NeoSurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com

Modern surrealism fantasy art gallery catalogue, contemporary surrealist artists. Neosurrealism fine-art images and digital pictures.

3D art fantasy wallpapers: digital art pictures artists images
Free Software 3D2D Art Digital: free full software downloads
Free 3DS models - Machinery appliances items, equipment tools gear.
NeoSurrealism 3D Artist George Grie: modern neo-surrealism art gallery. Contemporary surrealist artist
Art Digital Design: animated desktop wallpapers and computer backgrounds
Modern surrealism fantasy artists: surrealist art gallery
Funny pictures pop-art: fun body-art paint models

3D Art Wallpapers

Free 3D Software

Free 3D Models

Surreal 3D Artist

Animated Desktops

Modern Surrealists

Pop-art Gallery

digital fine art surrealism digital art picture
digital contemporary arts production online modern gallery

D.Ho

J-M.Rulier

Click thumbnail images to see further modern surreal fantasy artworks or visit artist's personal online gallery

famous foto-art images body art digital pictures
modern neo fantasy artists gallery, surrealism digital art picture

G.Katterbauer

J.Legac

back to gallery - - -
link exchange - - -
Our gallery catalogue presents modern artists of the following artistic genres:
- Dream art
- Fantasy art
- Fantastic art
- Fantastic realism
- Visionary art
- Neo-romanticism
- Neo-surrealism
- Magic realism
- Post-surrealism
- Etc.
 
France, French flagGermany, German flagItalia, Italian flagSpain, Spanish flagPortugal, Portuguese flag
translate this website
Examples of surrealism surreal erotica backgrounds free clipart
modern arts images surreal drawings wallpaper photo realism pictures

M.Escofet

C.Neofotistou

Click thumbnail pictures to see additional artworks of contemporary surrealism fantasy artist or visit his individual website

surrealism paintings surreal art wallpaper online studio design gallery
modern arts images surreal drawings wallpaper photo realism pictures

P.Lacombe

O.Lipchenko

If you are a serious creative artist with a strong commitment to your art, we would like to look at your work. There is no charge for inclusion in our exhibits. E-mail attachments of art will not be accepted except by pre-arrangement. Please include a website address (if any) where your art may be viewed. All submission inquiries will be acknowledged.
Copyright © neosurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com

page::

01
02
03
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
 
RECOMMENDED FOR READING
Contemporary art production modern gallery online The Beribboned Bomb: The Image of Woman in Male Surrealist Art
Book by Robert James Belton; University of Calgary Press, 1995

Because this well-travelled route usually denatures the treatment of Woman in its overemphasis on fan- tasy or form, it is not followed here. Besides, even in its visual manifes- tations Surrealism always inclined towards rhetoric, which Barthes characterized simply as "the signifying aspect of ideology." This ideol- ogy was formed partly by the status quo and partly by the intellectual hybridity of the Surrealists themselves. All of the Surrealists sought in- spiration outside their own fields, yet it took historians of the visual arts decades to go beyond passing allusions to examine precisely how, for example, even the least literary painters were deeply affected by litera- ture. Joan Miró is a case in point: he was long considered to be a playful primitive, completely free of intellectual preoccupation. In 1973, Margit Rowell questioned that commonly held opinion, discovering that Miró was greatly indebted to writers like Alfred Jarry, Arthur Rimbaud, Blaise Cendrars, and others. 9 The cross-fertilization worked both ways, of course: it is now known that a substantial component of Breton's liter- ary concept of femininity was inspired by his adolescent infatuation with the women in the paintings of Gustave Moreau. 10 Nevertheless, there are still many unanswered questions: why did Ernst read Edgar Allan Poe and Otto Weininger, why did Magritte like detective stories, and how did André Masson understand Johann Jakob Bachofen? Each of these questions and more will be dealt with in the course of this study.

This study consists of several interrelated essays. The first gives the general historical background. The second is a brief description of a spe- cies of masturbatory fantasy as a figure for Surrealist intervention in the world. The raw material for the production of this fantasy is then pro- vided in the next three chapters, which examine the images of Woman in male Surrealist art against intellectual backdrops assembled from fragments of psychology, literature and mythology. Of course, this is an over-simplification, for each essay speaks to its fellows in a way that expands, without exhausting, the significance of them all. The sixth essay is both a summary and a digression, raising two admittedly provocative questions: to what extent is Surrealism a relative of pornog- raphy, and how did women artists function within its discourse? Since the answers to both questions fall outside the reconstruction of the male horizon of expectations, there will be no attempt to foreclose future con- tributions to the discussion.

The continuous thread that holds these observations together comes to the surface from time to time in the words "cultural" or "intellectual fashion." These terms are too familiar to require an extended definition, but two brief examples would not be inappropriate. Masson once ob- served that he had willingly entered the Great War as a test of self. 11 His attitude was formed by a cultural fashion of about 1914, which saw all sorts of young people readily adopt notions of salubrious struggle and domination in the shadows of Darwin and Nietzsche. 12 In addition to this general conception of cultural fashion as "spirit of the times," there are more specific comments like this one, written by Breton in 1922: "psy- choanalysis is in fashion this winter." 13 With this in mind, I prefer the terms cultural and intellectual fashion to putative synonyms like Zeit- geist or Weltanschauung. 14 Neither of these words capitalize on the con- notative chain of the word "fashion" - style, mode, vogue, fad, rage, craze - the shared meaning element of which is a choice or usage (as in cloth- ing, habits, and beliefs) about whose value there is a consensus among those who regard themselves as sophisticated, in the know, and up to date. Despite the similar vocabulary, however, it will become clear that I have in mind something historically and metaphorically different from the connotations represented in studies of fashion as actual costume.
You might read the rest of the book at Questia olnline library
Copyright © neosurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com || Terms of Use
All images of the neosurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com collections are copyrighted by the original author, not this website. You might use the images on you website for educational, recommendation, and demonstration purposes only by including a mandatory reference link below.



Please do not link images directly to the site, download and store them on your web server. You may not actively redistribute or sublicense any of our graphics or digital media under any circumstances. The digital media may not be used in any online or other electronic distribution system, such as an online gallery or collection of graphics. Visitors are allowed to download art works for personal use free of charge. The images displayed here cannot be used for any commercial purpose, without written consent of the original author. Email us if you have any questions.
The above terms and conditions shall be governed by the laws of the USA, Canada, UK, Australia

fine-art & digital artists catalog NeoSurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com