modern fantasy artists NeoSurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com

Modern surrealism online art gallery, best famous, surrealist artists. Neo-surrealism, fine art canvas prints, framed digital art posters.

3D art fantasy wallpapers: digital art pictures artists images
Free Software 3D2D Art Digital: free full software downloads
Free 3DS models - army weapons, military objects, fighting items
Modern art surrealism prints by 3D Artist George Grie: limited edition art prints, posters, and calendars gallery.
Art Digital Design: animated desktop wallpapers and computer backgrounds
Modern artists surrealism pictures: surrealist art gallery
Funny pictures pop-art: fun body-art paint models

3D Art Wallpapers

Free 3D Software

Free 3D Models

Surreal 3D Artist

Animated Desktops

Modern Surrealists

Pop-art Gallery

Artwork surreal art modern, digital contemporary arts production online modern gallery
neo surrealism fantasy art images, free arts pictures fantasy paintings surrealist artists

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

modern neo fantasy artists gallery, surrealism digital art picture
the best online artists artworks, surrealism fantasy art image

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

View additional online artworks directly from the modern surreal fantasy artist's personal website

artists catalog - - -
link exchange - - -
This gallery presents modern artists of the following artistic genres:
- Dream art
- Fantasy art
- Fantastic art
- Fantastic realism
- Fairy art
- Visionary art
- Neo-romanticism
- Neo-surrealism
- Magic realism
- Outsider art
- Post-surrealism
- Celtic art
- Art deco


Digital Artists section - Collection of contemporary computer graphic artists.

Fine-art Artists section - Compilation of traditional classic painting & drawing pictures of the best surreal fantasy artists.
 
 
 
France, French flagGermany, German flagItalia, Italian flagSpain, Spanish flagPortugal, Portuguese flag
translate this website
fine art surrealism gallery surreal fantasy drawings, surreal graphic art pictures
neo surrealism fantasy art images, free arts pictures fantasy paintings surrealist artists

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

modern neo fantasy artists gallery, surrealism digital art picture
the best online artists artworks, surrealism fantasy art image

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

image preview, modern surrealism fantasy artist

View more pictures directly from the contemporary fantasy artist individual webpage


If you are a serious creative artist with a strong commitment to your art, we would like to look at your work. There is no charge for inclusion in our exhibits. E-mail attachments of art will not be accepted except by pre-arrangement. Please include a website address (if any) where your art may be viewed. All submission inquiries will be acknowledged.



Browse artists' online art galleries to find more fine art pictures, canvas art prints, custom made posters, and calendars. Most of the existing fine art galleries exhibit various limited edition prints for sale, art history materials, artifacts, and other framed prints products.

Digital Art

01
02
03
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
 

Fine Art

01
02
03
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
 
RECOMMENDED FOR READING

neo surrealism fantasy art images, free arts pictures fantasy paintings surrealist artists What Painting Is: How to Think about Oil Painting, Using the Language of Alchemy
Book by James Elkins; Routledge, 2000 - Introduction

WATER AND STONES. Those are the unpromising ingredients of two very different endeavors. The first is painting, because artists' pigments are made from fluids (these days, usually petroleum prod-ucts and plant oils) mixed together with powdered stones to give color. All oil paints, watercolors, gouaches, and acrylics are made that way, and so are more solid concoctions including pastels, ink blocks, crayons, and charcoal. They differ only in the proportions of water and stone-or to put it more accurately, medium and pigment. To make oil paint, for example, it is only necessary to buy powdered rock and mix it with a medium, say linseed oil, so that it can be spread with a brush. Very little more is involved in any pigment, and the same observations apply to other visual arts. Ceramics begins with the careful mixing of tap water and clay, and the wet clay slip is itself a dense mixture of stone and water. Watery mud is the medium of ceramists, just as oily mud is the medium of painters. Mural paint-ing uses water and stone, and tempera uses egg and stone. Even a medium like bronze casting relies on the capacity of "stone"-that is, the mixture of tin, lead, copper, zinc, and other metals-to become a river of bright orange fluid.

So painting and other visual arts are one example of negotiations between water and stone, and the other is alchemy. In alchemy, the Stone (with a capital S) is the ultimate goal, and one of the purposes of alchemy is to turn something as liquid as water into a substance as firm and unmeltable as stone. As in painting, the means are liquid and the ends are solid. And as in painting, most of alchemy does not have to do with either pure water or hard stones, but with mixtures of the two. Alchemists worked with viscid stews, with tacky drying films, with brittle skins of slag: in short, they were concerned with the same range of half-fluids as painters and other artists.

That is the first point of similarity between alchemy and painting. There is a second similarity that runs even deeper, and gives me the impetus to explain painting in such a strange way. In alchemy as in painting, there are people who prefer to live antiseptically, and think about the work instead of laboring over it. In alchemy, those are the "spiritual" or "meditative" alchemists, the ones who read about alchemy and ponder its meaning but try not to go near a laboratory; and in painting they are the critics and art historians who rarely venture close enough to a studio to feel the pull of paint on their fingers. 1 Perhaps because they are uncomfortable with paint, art historians prefer meanings that are not intimately dependent on the ways the paintings were made. Consider, for instance, the first of the color plates in this book (COLOR PLATE 1). An historian looking at this painting might recognize Sassetta, a fourteenth-century painter from Siena. Sassetta is known to art history as a late medieval artist who slowly adjusted his work to the emerging sensibility of the Florentine Renaissance. He knew about the important new works that were being made in Florence, and there are echoes and hints of them in his paintings, though in the end he remained faithful to the conservative Sienese ways. 2 We know a little about his life, and about his patrons and commissions; and we can guess at his friends, and the places he visited. Pictures can have many meanings of those kinds, and art history is a rich and complex field. But a painting is a painting, and not words describing the artist or the place it was made or the people who commissioned it. A painting is made of paint-of fluids and stone-and paint has its own logic, and its own meanings even before it is shaped into the head of a madonna. To an artist, a picture is both a sum of ideas and a blurry memory of "pushing paint, " breathing fumes, dripping oils and wiping brushes, smearing and diluting and mixing. Bleary preverbal thoughts are intermixed with the namable concepts, figures and forms that are being represented. The material memories are not usually part of what is said about a picture, and that is a fault in interpretation because every painting captures a certain resistance of paint, a prodding gesture of the brush, a speed and insistence in the face of mindless matter: and it does so at the same moment, and in the same thought, as it captures the expression of a face.

fine art surrealism gallery surreal fantasy drawings, surreal graphic art pictures In Sassetta's painting little brushstrokes form the face: they are delicate light touches that fall like lines of rain over the skin, coming down at a slight angle over the temples and next to the mouth. Brighter marks spread from the top of the forehead, crisscrossing the canted strokes over the temple. There are larger milky dapples just under the pink of the cheek-almost like downy hair-and curling marks that come around the neck and congregate on the collar bone. Sassetta has clasped three bright rings of sharp white (they are called Venus's collars) around the neck. The sum of brushstrokes is the evidence of the artist's manual devotion to his image: for Sassetta painting was the slow, pleasureful, careful and repetitious building of a face from minuscule droplets of pigment. The initial strokes were darker and more watery, and as the contours began to emerge he used whiter paint, and put more on his tiny brush, until he finally built up the forehead to a brilliant alabaster. This is a tempera painting, and in its period many painters used the medium as a way of showing devotion. Sassetta's lingering patience and fastidious attention remain fixed in the painting for everyone to see: they are a meaning of the method itself. 3

Recently, some art historians have become more interested in what paint can say. They suggest that since art history and criticism are so adept at thinking about what paint represents (that is, the stories and subjects, and the artists and their patrons), then it should also be possible to write something about the paint itself. What kinds of problems, and what kinds of meanings, happen in the paint? Or as one historian puts it, What is thinking in painting, as opposed to thinking about painting? 4 These are important questions, and they are very hard to answer using the language of art history. This is where alchemy can help, because it is the most developed language for thinking in substances and processes. For a "spiritual" alchemist, whatever happens in the furnace is an allegory of what takes place in the alchemist's mind or soul. The fetid water that begins the process is like the darkened spirit, confused and halfrotten. As the substances mingle and fuse, they become purer, stronger, and more valuable, just as the soul becomes more holy. The philosopher's stone is the sign of the mind's perfection, the almost transcendent state where all impurities have been killed, burned, melted away, or fused, and the soul is bright and calm. Alchemists paid close attention to their crucibles, watching substances mingle and separate, always in some degree thinking of the struggles and contaminations of earthly life, and ultimately wondering about their own souls and minds...

Please read the rest of the book at Questia online library
Copyright © neosurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com || Terms of Use
All images of the neosurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com collections are copyrighted by the original author, not this website. You might use the images on you website for educational, recommendation, and demonstration purposes only by including a mandatory reference link below.



Please do not link images directly to the site, download and store them on your web server. You may not actively redistribute or sublicense any of our graphics or digital media under any circumstances. The digital media may not be used in any online or other electronic distribution system, such as an online gallery or collection of graphics. Visitors are allowed to download art works for personal use free of charge. The images displayed here cannot be used for any commercial purpose, without written consent of the original author. Email us if you have any questions.
The above terms and conditions shall be governed by the laws of the USA, Canada, UK, Australia

modern surreal artists NeoSurrealism.artdigitaldesign.com

Online art gallery presents digital and fine art surrealist artists. Neo-surrealism, canvas art print, framed fine art posters, and gifts.